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The Treaty of Canandaigua, 1794

Continued from last week. Brothers You have attended this treaty a long time the articles which we have signed we hope you fully understand now as we have shown them to you we would wish to know your...

 

The Treaty of Canandaigua, 1794

Continued from last week. The Third day of the Council, November 4, 1794, Red Jacket continued: Brother - We the Sachems of the Six Nations will now tell you our minds, the business of this treaty is...

 

The Treaty Of Canandaigua, 1794

Continued from last week (United States Library of Congress, Indian Affairs Papers) On September 27, 1794, Pickering wrote: Two runners arrived the day before from Buffalo Creek with a message urging...

 

The Treaty of Canandaigua, 1794

Continued from last week The actions of New York State, which continued to obtain Haudenosaunee lands through fraud and trickery, combined with the treaties forced on the confederate nations by the Un...

 

The Treaty of Canandaigua, 1794

Continued from last week A significant part of the history and culture of the Haudenosaunee and Indians of the United States is the treaty. In last few week’s cultural corner you learned just what i...

 

What is a "Treaty"?

Continued from last week A report of the Lords of Trade was read in Council at the Court of St. James, November 23, 1761. It states: That it is as unnecessary as it would be tedious to enter into a...

 

Legend of the Three Sisters

Once upon a time very long ago, there were three sisters who lived together in a field. These sisters were quite different from one another in their size and also in their way of dressing. One of the...

 

What is a "Treaty"?

Continued from last week… The 1701 Treaty Conference Lieutenant Governor John Nanfan had succeeded the Earl of Bellomont as the Governor of New York. In early July 1701, “all the Sachims of the...

 

The Dish With One Spoon

Continued from last week 4 Strings Wampum (Simcoe Papers II, 131) By the 1840’s, other indigenous nations were also using the Dish With One Spoon as a means of resolving their land issues. In...

 

The Dish with one Spoon

Continued from last week (William Johnson Papers, II,705) After the defeat of the French in 1760,the British soon found themselves looked upon as possible arbitrators in hunting territory disputes...

 

The Dish With One Size

The Dish with One Spoon wampum belt, with the round purple area in the center symbolizing the dish. It was kept at the Six Nations Grand River Territory by Skanawati (John Buck) until his death. In...

 

Grand Council of the Haudenosaunee

Grand Council Meetings of the Iroquois Confederacy are held for serious matters, which affect all of the member nations: Mohawk, Oneida, Onondaga,...

 

The Founding of the Kahniakehaka (Mohawk) Nation Council

This article was provided using the knowledge of Chief John Arthur Gibson in Concerning the League: The Iroquois League Tradition as dictated in Onondaga. Interpreted by the Mohawk Nation Council in...

 

Wampum Belts of the Iroquois

By Tehanetorens Continued from last week Record of Chiefs of Mohawk Nation Mohawk Clan Chieftainship wampum Strings are a record of the leaders of...

 

Wampum Belts

The Wampum Belt information comes from Tehanetorens (Ray Fadden) who has left us many cultural and historical documents. Notes: While reading a wampum belt, special care was made to hold the belts...

 

Wampum Belts

Continued from last week The Five Nations became as brothers again. They worked together as one people. If anyone of these nations were attacked, the injury was felt by all of the Five Nations. The...

 

Wampum Belts

Continued from last week As wampum became more plentiful it was used more and more until it came to be regarded as something sacred. Wampum strings served a credentials or as a certificate of...

 

Wampum Belts

To most people a wampum belt means a beaded belt made by Aboriginals. White traders introduced glass beads and with these the Aboriginal people did beautiful embroidery work. Before the introduction...

 

THE COVENANT CHAIN

Continued from last week Maintenance In 1870, the Parliament of Canada had passed its first major Indian legislation, and the chiefs of the Ojibway and Haudenosaunee communities of southern Ontario an...

 

The Covenant Chain

Continued from last week Maintenance: The Kayanerekowa provides that the people must meet at regular intervals to reaffirm their commitment to the law and to the peace that it seeks to establish. The...

 

The Covenant Chain

Continued from last week GAVE A BELT (National Archives of Canada, RG 10, Vol. 1820, p. 276-290) In this speech are elements of several streams: the relationship of “Brethren” between the British...

 

THE COVENANT CHAIN

Continued from last week This last exchange illustrates another aspect of “council language”: to respond to an issue that might have been confrontational by putting it in positive language. The...

 

THE COVENANT CHAIN

Continued from last week… It was not only with the British that the Haudenosaunee had planted trees of peace. When Otrewati of the Onondagas spoke to governor de la Barre (Onontio or...

 

THE COVENANT CHAIN

Continued from last week… The Silver Covenant Chain, the emblem of the relationship between the Haudenosaunee and the Crown, contains many of the elements of the Kayanerekowa. Even in its...

 

THE COVENANT CHAIN

On behalf of the British Crown, Sir William Johnson described and renewed the Covenant Chain in council with the Haudenosaunee on several separate occasions. On April 25, 1748, he spoke to the...

 

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